June 16, 2024 The sun rises from Anatolia

6,000 life-size terracotta warriors guard a treasure-laden burial chamber

A new treasure-laden burial chamber has been discovered in the tomb of Emperor Qin Shi Huang, guarded by China’s world-famous 6,000 life-size terracotta warriors.

Qin Shi Huang was the first emperor of China, ruling from 259-210 BC. He founded the Qin Dynasty and unified China, creating a centralized imperial system. Although he was known for his harsh and ruthless rule, he also left his mark on Chinese history by carrying out important reforms and major projects.

Emperor Qin Shi Huang, who started the construction of the Great Wall of China in order to resist the Hun raids, was a ruler with a personality who was very afraid of death and the afterlife.

Therefore, in order to prevent any harm to his grave and corpse after his death, he had 6000 life-size terracotta soldiers built.

China’s first emperor Qin Shi Huang was a ruler who feared death and the afterlife.

The soldiers were buried in the burial chamber with horses, chariots and all other equipment necessary for war.

The tomb of Qin Shi Huang is the largest mausoleum in the world, covering an area of 22 square miles, most of which has yet to be excavated due to concerns about damage from seismic activity, the elements and looters. A 2010 excavation uncovered a massive palace consisting of 18 courtyard-style houses arranged around a central building. The palace is a quarter the size of Beijing’s Forbidden City and is considered its conceptual ancestor, although this was intended for the emperor to live in after his death.

The most recent excavations found a massive 16-ton coffin hidden with treasures inside a tomb that may have belonged to Qin Shi Huang’s son.

According to the historian Sima Qian (also known as Shiji), who lived in 85 BC, after the death of Qin Shi Huang, his youngest son Hu Hai took the throne after killing all his rivals. Prince Gao told his brother that he regretted not voluntarily following his father into the afterlife and demanded that he be killed and buried in the great mausoleum. Hu Hai was happy to oblige.

Prince Gao’s story may be a complete fabrication. Although the Shiji is a chronicle, like Livy’s Ab urbe condita, it treats legend and tradition as fact. For example, the shrine is said by the Shiji to have “100 rivers of mercury” flowing through it. Perhaps the 100 rivers story was exaggerated, but not entirely fabricated as soil testing revealed mercury levels 100 times higher than normal.

Photo: Netflix

The discovery of a 16-ton coffin in a large burial chamber near the mausoleum of Qin Shi Huang and his terracotta warriors may now bring the legend to life.

The coffin was found to contain very rich grave deposits, including weapons, armor, jade, a pair of gold and silver camels, a set of utensils and 6,000 bronze coins. With such a grand funeral, the deceased must have been one of the sons of the Qin Emperor or even a high-ranking warrior.

“I’m still surprised every time I go down,” excavation leader Jiang Wenxiao said, The Times reported.

“After the first emperor died, his sons all met a bad end, so I am more inclined to believe that this tomb belonged to a high-ranking nobleman or army chief,” Jiang Wenxiao said.

Wenxiao added the following: “The tomb is very precisely constructed. It is very deep, very large-scale. Most ancient tombs have been robbed, so we didn’t have much hope for the coffin chamber. But it turned out it was not robbed. We were amazed.”

Given unprecedented access to the mausoleum and the ongoing excavation, a British-Chinese co-production was able to film the discovery. Premiering June 12 on Netflix, The Mysteries of the Terracotta Warriors will center on the discoveries.

Cover Photo: Terracotta warriors from the mausoleum of the first Qin emperor of China Qin Shi Huang, c. 221-206 B.C.E., Qin Dynasty, painted terracotta, Terracotta Warriors and Horses Museum, Shaanxi, China. Photo: Will Clayton, CC BY 2.0

Banner
Related Articles

The magnificent throne room of the Knossos Palace is believed to be the oldest throne room in Europe

March 15, 2024

March 15, 2024

The Minoan civilization, a flourishing Bronze Age culture, thrived on the island of Crete between 2700 BC and 1450 BC....

Tide reveals a Bronze Age fort on the Irish island of Clew Bay

April 1, 2024

April 1, 2024

A sunken Bronze Age fort has been discovered on the island of Clew Bay off the coast of North Mayo,...

The remains of a villa thought to have belonged to the Roman Emperor Augustus have been found in Italy

April 19, 2024

April 19, 2024

Excavations in a volcanic ash-covered region of southern Italy have uncovered the remains of a 2,000-year-old building. The excavation team...

World’s oldest erotic graffiti found on the Greek island of Astypalaia

April 6, 2024

April 6, 2024

It was 2014 when prehistoric archaeologist Dr. Andreas Vlachopoulos discovered the world’s oldest erotic graffiti. Dr. Andreas Vlachopoulos made his...

First Pacific cities appear 700 years earlier than known

April 16, 2024

April 16, 2024

A new study using LIDAR has found new evidence to suggest that the first Pacific cities were founded in 300...

Antibiotic bacteria that fight E. coli and other dangerous bacteria found in Roman Baths in England

June 9, 2024

June 9, 2024

Researchers from Plymouth University’s School of Biomedical Sciences have discovered that the popular Roman Baths in the city of Bath...

Archaeologists find 1,000-year-old bone skate

March 16, 2024

March 16, 2024

Archaeologists have discovered a 1,000-year-old bone skate in Přerov, Czech Republic. The find is seen as evidence that people in...

Archaeologists find Bronze Age settlement in Poland during a survey ahead of S1 highway construction

April 25, 2024

April 25, 2024

A Bronze Age settlement was uncovered during the construction of the S1 highway between Oświęcim and Dankowice in Poland. According...

6000-year-old Chalcolithic ivory pot discovered in Israel

April 10, 2024

April 10, 2024

An excavation near Beersheba in southern Israel has unearthed a jar made of ivory tusks dating to the Chalcolithic period...

Scientists discover 99 million-year-old bedbug hidden in amber

April 24, 2024

April 24, 2024

Scientists at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (HU) found bedbug in amber from Myanmar. It was determined that the bedbug...

New areas of ancient art have been discovered in the Jalapão region of Tocantins, Brazil

March 9, 2024

March 9, 2024

Archaeologists working in the Jalapão region of Tocantins, Brazil, have made a significant discovery: 16 new archaeological sites containing ancient...

Magnet fisherman pulls out a sturdy Viking sword from the River Cherwell

March 10, 2024

March 10, 2024

Magnet fisherman Trevor Penny pulled a intact Viking sword from the River Cherwell in West Oxfordshire last November. Magnet fishing,...

200-year-old cherries found in the cellar of George Washington’s mansion

April 23, 2024

April 23, 2024

Two bottles were found in the cellar of the Virginia mansion of George Washington, the first president of the United...

Three Roman tombs discovered in Ossónoba, Portugal, where the Visigoths ruled

April 18, 2024

April 18, 2024

Three tombs dating to the 5th or 6th century AD have been unearthed in the ancient Roman city of Ossónoba...

In the Mediterranean Oldest Hand-Sewn Boat is Preparing for its Next Journey

January 25, 2024

January 25, 2024

The oldest hand-sewn boat in the Mediterranean was discovered in the Bay of Zambratija near Umag on Croatia’s Istrian peninsula....

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *