June 16, 2024 The sun rises from Anatolia

A rare stone mask discovered on Mount Hebron, more than 9,500 years old, will go on public display

A rare stone mask more than 9,500 years old, discovered on Mount Hebron, will go on public display at the Israel Museum in Jerusalem.

The mask made of Dolomitic limestone was unearthed by an archaeological team from the Civil Administration near the settlement of Pnei Hever.

Archaeologists date the stone mask to the Pre-Pottery Neolithic B period in the 8th millennium BC.

The mask may provide new insights into the religious beliefs of the prehistoric people who lived in that region.Archaeologists studying the mask believe it may represent an ancient deified ancestor figure or primitive supernatural being. The mask is also considered a highly significant religious artifact from a period about which relatively little is known.

A rare stone mask discovered on Mount Hebron, more than 9,500 years old, will go on public display
Photo: AFP

According to JNS, the newly discovered mask displays a highly refined design, emphasizing large eye sockets and an open mouth area. Notably, the mask’s teeth are carved in relief, likely deliberately crafted to resemble a human skull. It also features four strategically placed attachment holes that would allow it to be securely fastened to a person’s face or mounted on a pole during ceremonial rituals.

“This is an extraordinary discovery that reveals new insights into the spiritual and symbolic traditions of some of the world’s earliest Neolithic cultures in this region,” said Elie Borowski, curator of prehistoric antiquities at the Israel Museum. “The funerary context and skull-like aesthetics of the mask strongly suggest that it had highly sacred ceremonial purposes.”

A rare stone mask discovered on Mount Hebron, more than 9,500 years old, will go on public display
Photo: Antiquities Theft Prevention Unit, Israel Antiquities Authority

The Israel Museum, which will display the stone mask, also announced that it will exhibit for the first time decorative wall tiles excavated from the site of the Tomb of David on Jerusalem’s Mount Zion. According to biblical tradition, the catacomb is believed to be the burial place of King David.

Cover Photo: Ronit Lupo of the Israel Antiquities Authority holds a 9,000-year-old stone mask recovered from thieves by the Antiquities Authority Theft Prevention Unit in southern Hebron Hills, during a press conference in Jerusalem on Nov. 28, 2018. Photo by Yonatan Sindel/Flash90.

Banner
Related Articles

The remains of a villa thought to have belonged to the Roman Emperor Augustus have been found in Italy

April 19, 2024

April 19, 2024

Excavations in a volcanic ash-covered region of southern Italy have uncovered the remains of a 2,000-year-old building. The excavation team...

Remains of Norman Bridge found during excavations at Chichester’s Priory Park in England

June 2, 2024

June 2, 2024

The remains of a military causeway or bridge leading to an 11th-century Norman castle were found during excavations at Chichester’s...

A 16th century Italian ‘vampire’ found buried with a brick in its mouth has had its face reconstructed

March 23, 2024

March 23, 2024

The face of a “vampire” whose grave was dug up in Venice in the 16th century and found with a...

6,000 life-size terracotta warriors guard a treasure-laden burial chamber

June 9, 2024

June 9, 2024

A new treasure-laden burial chamber has been discovered in the tomb of Emperor Qin Shi Huang, guarded by China’s world-famous...

A group of Bronze Age metal objects discovered in Poland

March 6, 2024

March 6, 2024

A local metal detecting group in Poland has discovered a group of Bronze Age metal objects, including axe heads and...

First of its kind 1600-year-old indoor swimming pool unearthed in Albania

May 13, 2024

May 13, 2024

Archaeologists in the Albanian city of Durrës excavated an ancient Roman villa with an indoor pool. According to archaeologists, the...

Human brains preserve in diverse environments for at least 12 000 years

March 21, 2024

March 21, 2024

A study by forensic anthropologist Alexandra Morton-Hayward and her team from the University of Oxford has shown that the human...

Remains of trematosaurs from 250 million years ago found in Poland

April 23, 2024

April 23, 2024

Polish researchers have found 250 million-year-old remains of Trematosaurs, early Triassic amphibians that resemble modern-day crocodiles. In a new publication...

Unique gold ring and crystal amulet among 30,000 medieval treasures uncovered in Sweden

March 7, 2024

March 7, 2024

In the Swedish medieval city of Kalmar, archaeologists from the State Historical Museums unearthed the remains of over 30,000 objects...

7,000-year-old canoes discovered in Italy show early development of maritime technology in the Mediterranean

March 21, 2024

March 21, 2024

A series of canoes estimated to be 7,000 years old have been discovered in the Neolithic (Late Stone Age) lakeshore...

Oldest Iberian city unearthed in Contestania

May 11, 2024

May 11, 2024

Archaeologists from the University of Alicante and the University of Murcia have uncovered the oldest largest Iberian city in the...

World’s largest dinosaur track found in Fujian

May 8, 2024

May 8, 2024

Chinese scientists announced on Monday, May 6, that they had discovered very large tracks of a type of two-toed dinosaur...

Archaeologists find 1,000-year-old bone skate

March 16, 2024

March 16, 2024

Archaeologists have discovered a 1,000-year-old bone skate in Přerov, Czech Republic. The find is seen as evidence that people in...

130,000-year-old stingray sand sculpture in South Africa may be world’s oldest animal art

April 4, 2024

April 4, 2024

The researchers analyzed an object that at first glance appears to be a symmetrical rock east of Still Bay, about...

A 4,000-year-old Egyptian skull reveals possible attempts to treat cancer

May 29, 2024

May 29, 2024

Surgical scars on a 9500-year-old skull found in the Aşıklı mound in Anatolia caused great astonishment in the scientific world....

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *