May 21, 2024 The sun rises from Anatolia

Archaeologists find rare Tyrian purple lump at Carlisle excavations

In 2023, archaeologists discovered a rare lump of Tyrian Purple during excavations at a Roman Bath on the grounds of Carlisle Cricket Club.

During the excavations carried out by the archaeologists and volunteers of the Roman Carlisle Reveal Project, the sewage system of a monumental building with baths built in the 3rd century during the reign of Emperor Septimius Severus was uncovered.

The purple pigment recovered inside the baths has been tested with the support of the British Geological Society and further analysis is underway with Newcastle University.

According to experts at Newcastle University, the pigment is organic and contains amounts of beeswax and bromine, which suggests it is Tyrian Purple, the color connected to the Roman Empire’s Imperial Court.

Frank Giecco, Technical Director at Wardell Armstrong, said: “For millennia, Tyrian Purple was the world’s most expensive and sought after colour. It’s presence in Carlisle combined with other evidence from the excavation all strengthens the hypothesis that the building was in some way associated with the Imperial Court of the Emperor Septimius Severus which was located in York and possibly relates to an Imperial visit to Carlisle.

“It’s the only example we know of in Northern Europe – possibly the only example of a solid sample of the pigment in the form of unused paint pigment anywhere in the Roman Empire. Examples have been found of it in wall paintings (like in Pompeii) and some high status painted coffins from the Roman province of Egypt.”

Tyrian Purple is made from thousands of crushed seashells from the Eastern Mediterranean, North Africa, or Morrocco. It was phenomenally difficult to make and expensive and was worth more than gold pound for pound (three times as much in some sources).

Tyrian purple is a reddish-purple natural dye. It was one of the most expensive dyes in antiquity, and was highly prized for its rich color and its permanence. Tyrian purple was produced from the mucus of several species of murex snails, which are found in the Mediterranean Sea. The process of extracting the dye was laborious and time-consuming, and it required thousands of snails to produce a single gram of dye. This made Tyrian purple a highly sought-after commodity, and it was often used to dye the robes of royalty and other dignitaries.

Tyrian purple was produced from the mucus of several species of murex snails found in the Mediterranean.

Tyrian purple was first produced by the Phoenicians in the 12th century BC. It was later adopted by the Greeks, Romans and Byzantines. It was a symbol of royalty, power and wealth. It was often worn by kings, emperors and other high-ranking officials.

Banner
Related Articles

200-year-old cherries found in the cellar of George Washington’s mansion

April 23, 2024

April 23, 2024

Two bottles were found in the cellar of the Virginia mansion of George Washington, the first president of the United...

1800-year-old Sassanid clay seal reads name of Iranian city

April 11, 2024

April 11, 2024

A 1,800-year-old clay seal from the Sassanid era, written in Pahlavi script, reads the name of the Iranian city of...

Oldest Iberian city unearthed in Contestania

May 11, 2024

May 11, 2024

Archaeologists from the University of Alicante and the University of Murcia have uncovered the oldest largest Iberian city in the...

Greek-Ilyrian helmet more than 2500 years old discovered in Croatia

April 16, 2024

April 16, 2024

A Greek-Illyrian helmet more than 2,500 years old was discovered at the Gomile cave burial site in the village of...

850-year-old medieval coins discovered in a grave in Sweden

April 27, 2024

April 27, 2024

Archaeologists have opened the grave of a man they believe was between 20 and 25 years old when he died....

Roman cupid figurine found during road construction work

May 7, 2024

May 7, 2024

A Roman cupid figurine was found during road construction work on the A417 in the Cotswolds. Archaeological excavations carried out...

A group of Bronze Age metal objects discovered in Poland

March 6, 2024

March 6, 2024

A local metal detecting group in Poland has discovered a group of Bronze Age metal objects, including axe heads and...

The earliest evidence of Christianity in Bulgarian lands has been discovered

March 5, 2024

March 5, 2024

Early Christians in the Roman Empire were forced to conceal their faith. This was because Christianity was not officially recognized...

The magnificent throne room of the Knossos Palace is believed to be the oldest throne room in Europe

March 15, 2024

March 15, 2024

The Minoan civilization, a flourishing Bronze Age culture, thrived on the island of Crete between 2700 BC and 1450 BC....

Scientists offer new insight into when the first humans may have appeared off the coast of Southeast Alaska

April 25, 2024

April 25, 2024

For many years, scientists investigate when the first humans made the first footprints in North America. The discovery of a...

Circular shaped Iron Age Gallic village found in France using LIDAR technology

April 2, 2024

April 2, 2024

At Cap d’Erquy in the Côtes d’Armor region of France, satellite imaging technology has uncovered the remains of a circular...

Remains of trematosaurs from 250 million years ago found in Poland

April 23, 2024

April 23, 2024

Polish researchers have found 250 million-year-old remains of Trematosaurs, early Triassic amphibians that resemble modern-day crocodiles. In a new publication...

7,000-year-old canoes discovered in Italy show early development of maritime technology in the Mediterranean

March 21, 2024

March 21, 2024

A series of canoes estimated to be 7,000 years old have been discovered in the Neolithic (Late Stone Age) lakeshore...

American archaeologists discover 13,000-year-old beads at La Prele Mammoth Site

March 9, 2024

March 9, 2024

Archaeologists have made an important discovery at the La Prele Mammoth site in Converse County, Wyoming in the United States....

A 7000-year-old Neolithic settlement discovered in Serbia

April 30, 2024

April 30, 2024

The ROOTS team discovered a previously unknown Late Neolithic settlement near the Tamiš River in Northeast Serbia. The discovery provides...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *