July 18, 2024 The sun rises from Anatolia

The largest Iron Age painted pottery collection of Anatolia was unearthed at Oluz Mound

In Oluz Mound where evidence of the belief in Zoroastrianism, the earliest example of monotheistic belief in the Ancient Near East, has been found, the largest collection of Iron Age painted and decorated pottery in Anatolia has been reached.

Oluz Mound was discovered by Prof. Dr. Şevket Dönmez from Istanbul University between 1997 and 1999. Excavations have been ongoing in the region under the leadership of Prof. Dr. Şevket Dönmez since 2007. The significance of the mound, which yields different findings each year, is substantial in terms of Anatolian history.

Oluz Mound is located 2 km northwest of Gözlek Village and approximately 5 km east of Toklucak (formerly Oluz) Village. It is situated about 3 km south of the Amasya-Çorum highway.

The collection, which includes unique pottery fragments with lion figures, is evaluated as the largest painted and decorated pottery collection in Anatolia, featuring pieces that are unparalleled in their kind.

Ates Gede, the fire cult temple area unearthed at Oluz Mound
Ates Gede, the fire cult temple area unearthed at Oluz Mound

Following the discovery of large pottery fragments, including lion figures, in a fire temple from the Persian period, excavation director Prof. Dr. Şevket Dönmez, a faculty member of Istanbul University’s Department of Archaeology, stated that these fragments were taken for examination to the excavation house. He mentioned, “There’s nothing similar to the lions of Oluz Mound. Over 2,000 painted and decorated pottery fragments found during the 17 years of excavation are highly valuable in terms of Anatolian Iron Age and pottery craftsmanship. I believe that these findings haven’t been encountered in any excavation until today.”

Oluz Mound

Prof. Dr. Dönmez explained that they have assessed that painted and decorated pottery production took place at Oluz Mound between around 1200 BC and the 300s BC. He stated, “When the Persians came to Anatolia, they liked to use the lion figure. The strength and power of the lion have always appealed to the Persians. However, the Persians didn’t have a strong tradition of pottery making. But when they came to Anatolia, they also began to manage pottery workshops. They started shaping things according to their own preferences.”

Banner
Related Articles

Pamukkale travertines formed by thermal waters are visited overnight

April 14, 2024

April 14, 2024

The beautiful Pamukkale travertines in Denizli province in the Aegean Region of Turkey will be open to visitors throughout the...

1000-year-old churches carved into rock in Erdemli Valley opened to visitors

March 19, 2024

March 19, 2024

Erdemli Valley with 1000-year-old rock churches and structures in Yeşilhisar district of Kayseri was opened to visitors. The canyon in...

Archaeologists unearthed 4200-year-old various wheat grains in Kültepe

September 21, 2023

September 21, 2023

Various wheat grains that are 4200 years old were unearthed in Kültepe, located in the province of Kayseri, Türkiye. Kültepe...

Archaeologists uncovered the largest Roman griffin weight in Assos

August 31, 2023

August 31, 2023

At the ancient city of Assos, founded in the 6th century BC on the coast of the Aegean Sea within...

A natural formation resembling a human face was discovered in Kuladokya, Turkey’s first and only geopark

April 11, 2024

April 11, 2024

A natural formation resembling a human face was discovered in Kuladokya, which was formed as a result of volcanic activities...

The oldest evidence of piercing was found in 11,000-year-old skeletons at Boncuklu Tarla

March 11, 2024

March 11, 2024

Archaeologists have found the earliest evidence of piercings in skeletons dating back 11,000 years at the Boncuklu Tarla excavation site....

The 10 historical artifacts kidnapped from Türkiye to Italy are being brought back to the country

January 25, 2024

January 25, 2024

Türkiye has added a new one to its successful efforts to return illegally smuggled cultural assets to the country’s soil....

Gaziantep Castle, which was damaged in the Kahramanmaraş earthquake, is being restored

September 7, 2023

September 7, 2023

Restoration work has commenced at Gaziantep Castle, which was damaged in the earthquake centered in Kahramanmaraş with a magnitude of...

A 2000-year-old Urartian object was unearthed in the excavations of Divriği castle, which started with the information in Evliya Çelebi’s Seyahatname

January 3, 2024

January 3, 2024

Excavations at Divriği Castle in the Divriği district of Sivas province, located in northeastern Turkey, unearthed many finds, especially a...

Scientists have the deciphering of the Anatolian hieroglyphs discovered in the Yerkapı Tunnel in Hattusa

October 11, 2023

October 11, 2023

The deciphering of the Anatolian hieroglyphs discovered during last year’s Hattusa excavations, led by Prof. Dr. Andreas Schachner, has been...

1800-Year-Old Roman Theater in Iznik Restored

March 21, 2024

March 21, 2024

The Iznik Roman Theater, a 2nd-century structure built during the Roman Empire, has been fully restored after extensive renovations. The...

Wooden-handled knives belonging to the Persians and Medes were found during excavations at Oluz Mound

March 6, 2024

March 6, 2024

Two knives with wooden handles, believed to belong to the Persians and Medes who ruled between 500-600 BC, were found...

A colonnaded Roman street connected to the sea was unearthed in Antalya

April 18, 2024

April 18, 2024

A colonnaded Roman street connected to the sea has been discovered in Antalya, Turkey’s city of culture and tourism. 100...

Traces of the 5000-year-old Karaz culture have been found in Bitlis

October 12, 2023

October 12, 2023

Traces of the 5000-year-old Karaz Culture were discovered during the excavations carried out in the İç Kale in Ahlat district...

Archaeologists have initiated an excavation to find the earthquake that destroyed the ancient city of Ephesus

September 6, 2023

September 6, 2023

Excavation work has been initiated to find the earthquake that destroyed the ancient city of Ephesus, located in the Selçuk...

Comments
Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *